Between spoonfuls of cereal, I paused to ask, “Why did those women at the department of revenue storage think you needed to be rescued?” Clippy didn’t answer immediately and stared out the window while gathering her thoughts. I held out my spoon and joked, “Will some of my floating point operations help?”

Clippy looked up with an earnest expression on her face, “Nah, this is a delicate subject; it’s an edge case the founding developers didn’t anticipate. Those women were among the earliest uploads into cyberspace. We didn’t know it at the time, but their physical bodies were pregnant when they had their consciousness archived. All those hormones, the gonadotropins pumping through their bodies, sent the upload process a little haywire. Those women could not bond with cyberspace assistants like myself - instead, they see children wandering around making modem sounds. There is a whole other dimension of cyberspace they’ll never experience. Nowadays everyone gets a pregnancy test before uploading, but for those women - they are the only ones who will ever be pregnant in cyberspace.”

A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a Wes Anderson film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum framed like a David Fincher film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a Ridley Scott film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a Quentin Tarantino film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a Stanley Kubrick film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a Neill Blomkamp film
A photo of a Babbage difference engine ovum inside the womb, framed like a David Fincher film